Tag: story making

7 story start tips : Write Monday

What type of story do you want to tell?

I can think of dozens of types of stories, mythical, cultural folktales, fairytales, cautionary fables, historical or generational stories. Yet most stories will boil down to what the story leaves the audience or readers feeling. Happy or sad? I can think of happy endings in war stories, family sagas or generational stories. Romance and fantasy could end either way, even if contemporary fiction genres tend to lean romance to happy endings. But truly if you live through the loss of your first BIG love, you know romance does not promise happy endings. So you the story-teller or writer must make this first and huge choice, happy or sad.  

A sad or happy story?

Well, of course, there is the option of leaving the ending open to interpretation. You could leave your characters hanging, waiting for a phone call, not dying after being shot or wishing he had killed the guy, and wondering if he did? Yet the bulk of stories are looked at as happy or sad. Do you like to watch happy TV shows and movies? Do you enjoy sad endings? Some people do.

Alex Hair Flip

How to add emotion to a story

  1. Start with an undo character, fighting for someone else’s safety
  2. Hurt your main character either physically or emotionally early in your story
  3. Begin your story with a loss for the character, family or village, etc.
  4. Have your main character suffer a social rejection at school, within a town or by a good friend
  5. Show your main character fighting for emotional or physical control (We love grace under pressure.)
  6. Create challenging “bad” weather” that stops your character just as he or she starts wanting to achieve, learn, etc.
  7. Set up a worthy opponent or “bad” guy or girl early in your story 

For more ideas on helping your live audience or readers feel emotions from your story

visit “How to Add Emotion to a Story” at WikiHow.

See WikiHow post below on “Adding Emotion a novel your are writing.”

We love our readers.

Do you love rainy nights? Do you love telling stories that turn your audience’s expectations up-side-down? Do you love include weather references that set up one idea, such as a dark and stormy night and turn it into the best night your main character ever had?

Think of your story as a slice of an ongoing story.

Things have happened before we start listening or reading.

Know that things will happen after listeners or readers finish with your story.

Please share if you enjoyed our

“Write Monday” Dog Leader Mysteries blog post.

Readers, please suggest stressors for my list.

Clever story hints from Shakespeare

Story hints

“The point of view, or narrative mode, Shakespeare uses in his plays, like most plays, is the third person objective view point. We know that plays are narrated in third person because we do not see the play through one character’s perspective; we do not frequently see the word I appear in the play.” Tamara K.H. on Notes.com

A limited third person point of view

In a limited third person point of view, an author does not have access to his characters’ thoughts. This strengthens the illusion that the acting on stage is similar to our lives. A well-done limited 3rd person play persuades and enthralls with its lifelike believability. The characters try to keep their secrets and pretend to go along with mischief or the follies of friends.

a truly great storyteller
Portrait of William Shakespeare

Shakespeare, a limited third POV?

From a storyteller’s point of view, Shakespeare pretends to have a limited third person point of view, thus drawing in his audience. This approach allows audiences to imagine that they witness a world that stands alone. Yet this master playwright, who holds himself outside of his creations heads, tips characters into disclosing intimate details, foibles, morals and thoughts through cleverness. He causes his characters to lie. Then he makes others find out a lie and force out a confession. Shakespeare’s characters, a points of stress, have an aloud chat with him or herself. An well-known example occurs in Hamlet when Prince Hamlet gives his famous “to be or not to be” soliloquy.

What can I do? I’m not Shakespeare.

I say that depends on what genre you write in. What type of story you want to tell? 

  • comedy = happy endings, people get married, renew love and hope
  • tragedy= a death, a war, a huge loss, etc.
  • history = fact based story
  • myth & fantasy = a mixed bag of hopeful beginnings & terrible hurts

William Shakespeare wrote poetry and plays. He wrote plays in the history, tragedy and comedy categories. He also added bits of fantasy as in the dream scene in Midsummer Nights’ Dream. Of considered a writer’s writer or the best of all English playwrights, Shakespeare’s genius has been lately questioned. Some scholars challenge the idea of one man writing the massive volume of works attributed to William Shakespeare. Other scholars, of course, argue that a single man, named Shakespeare, wrote plays for a theatre troupe he knew well. The plays tend to use character types and one playwright would unite the plays by the talents and strengths of specific actors. Thus  a single playwright wrote all the plays attributed to Shakespeare.

What do you think? Was Shakespeare a rare genius or a name put to poetry and plays written by more than one man?

Tragedy, comedy and poetry
William Shakespeare

Poems of William Shakespeare #free downloads

10 Shakespeare Quotes that you can use in Modern English

November 2, 2015

Write Monday: a story must have legs

A story must have legs

I believe this phrase comes as part of a fable or joke, if you know the origins please leave me a comment. A big part of my day ended up being in learning mode on human and mammalian evolution. We even took a turn into the engaging long galleries on dinosaurs, filled with families taking photographs and selfies posed before the bones of many an extinct creature.

So we sit, still in Act I, our opening for creative nonfiction or fiction. Of course, the legs our stories need do not have any real component, these legs we think about help us to define, form and structure our story like an animal that can stand up and walk. Why do I suggest our stories need to walk on their own legs?

Can you believe these were herbivores?
Can you believe these were herbivores?
Writers need surprises, too

When a story has good or great bones, it can walk, swim or fly off into surprsing territories. Once you examine what type of animal or genre you write. Much of your headaches settle in the area of telling the story. No matter what Act you happen to be writing, knowing the bones of your story makes the writing come much more easily.

  • bones give shape to stories
  • bones help stories walk, crawl, swim or fly
  • bones help writers pace their stories in readers hands
  • bones lend mood to stories & hint at the ending
  • bones can glow in the dark, long after the story has end
Does this start a story?
Am I looking down or looking up through a mirror?

“…no surprises for the writer, no surprises for the reader.” Robert Frost

Comparing stories to stage plays

We can also look at stories and compare them to types of performance art or stage play. Choosing wether your story leans into comedy toward laughter, romps, mixups and ending in marriage and song, or if your story leans toward tragedy bring tears to our eyes and ending in the main character’s death, or for that matter if your story fits a hero’s journey full of challenges, action, thrills, fear. death, mystery and triumph. Defining your genre or story type helps the read know right away what type of a story he or she has landed in.

Tune in next Monday for more on Act I

I promise to talk about POV or what is known as point of view and choices available to writers as they being a story of any length. If you write for adults and an educated audience, then switching points of view can work well. Often writers of fiction tell stories from multiple points of view. Your first choice does not have to limit you in your revisions, but it helps to have a solid idea, through reading many, many books like the one your are working on, to gage what works effectively for you as the reader.

  • First person point of view uses the pronoun, I..
  • Second person point of view uses the pronoun, You…
  • Third person point of view uses the pronouns, she, he, and they,

    Does this dog look fearful?
    What’s the story here?

Thanks for reading, caring and sharing, Deborah Taylor-French